Achievements

This year's recipients from Loyola are Mary Katherine Richardson, Catharine Ohlsson Gracia, Jason A. Matt, James Craig Diamond, and Sean Erin Williams

The New Orleans native was officially appointed April 25 by Judge-Elect Ellen Hazeur, who previously served as the court’s clerk.

Professor Andrea Armstong calls for a citizen oversight of Orleans Parish jails in a new essay penned for The Data Center.   The report titled The Impact of 300 Years of Jail Conditions is part of a series inviting local authors to weigh in modern-day racial disparities in New Orleans and the history behind them.

Loyola University New Orleans is proud to announce that the Loyola Law Clinic is tied for 31st on the "U.S. News and World Report" 2018 list of the Best Clinical Training programs.The Loyola Law Clinic hosts nine clinics – Community Justice, Criminal Defense, Workplace Justice, Immigration, Technology & Legal Innovation, Family Law, Children's Rights, Misdemeanor, and Prosecution. This national ranking recognizes the impressive and important work of the College of Law in training the next generation of lawyers. 

They are Eric Simonson, J.D. ’92, Jedd Malish, J.D. ’95, and Mary Nell Bennett, J.D. ’09.

15 alumni of Loyola University New Orleans College of Law have been named to the 2018 class of New Orleans CityBusiness’ 2018 Leadership in Law. Leadership in Law honors “50 outstanding legal professionals whose successes in law and contributions to the community have set the pace for the legal community.” A special Leadership in Law insert profiling all honorees will run in the May 25 issue of CityBusiness.

Professor Bill Quigley argued to the First Circuit Court of Appeals in support of voting rights for individuals from Louisiana on probation and parole.  Professors Davida Finger, Andrea Armstrong, and Johanna Kalb were involved in Amicus briefs submitted to the court for this case.

Professors Andrea Armstrong, Lloyd Drury, and Luz Molina have been recognized for their career and community accomplishments.

In the coming year, the Associate Deans section intends to create resources for associate law deans around the country.

M. Isabel Medina's  “Silencing Talk about Race:  Why Arizona’s Prohibition of Ethnic Studies Violates Equality,” was published in volume 45 of the Hastings Constitutional Law Quarterly.  Her Wilters Lecture at the University of South Alabama formed the basis of the piece, “In Search of the Nation of Immigrants:  Balancing the Federal State Divide,” published at volume 20 of the Harvard Latinx Law Review.

Pages

Filter Results: